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20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of us were waiting this week for mitt romney and barack obama to connect with reality, to connect with the lives we actually live. it didn't happen. the 90-minute debate went by, for example, without a word about immigration. not a thing said about the countless people trapped in our muddled policy. and this in colorado, a swing state, where both romney and obama have been courting the large hispanic vote. that wouldn't have happened if my guest on this week's broadcast had been moderating the debate, but their participation was rejected by the tiny group of insiders who set the rules. that's a shame because george ram mows and maria elena sorena are two of the most popular journalists. they work for the most important spanish language network in the country, univision. i met them for the first time earlier this week when they were in town to receive the emmy award for lifetime achievement from the national academy of television arts and sciences. here's part of the video presentation that introduced them to the emmy audience. >> they're two of the most well-recognized journalists
all the problems romney has had for the last few weeks? >> i think part of obama's problem was his coaching and i also think he was leaning too much on his income ben sea instead of getting out there assuming he was on the same level as romney. >> just an advisory board, yes. >> what i support is no change for current retirees and near retirees to medicare, and the president supports taking $716 billion out of that program. i want to take that $716 billion you have cut and put it back into medicare. by the way, we can include a prescription program if we need to improve it but the idea of cutting $716 billion from medicare to be able to balance the additional cost of obamacare is, in my opinion, a mistake. >> if you repeal obamacare, and i have become fond of this term, obamacare, if you repeal it, what happens is, those seniors right away are going to be paying $600 more in prescription care, and the primary beneficiary of that repeal are insurance companies that are estimated to gain billions of dollars back when they aren't maaren't making sen healthier, and i don't think that's
. >> suarez: with president obama, he's has been less hostile, but no less theatrical, this week confidently saying the two would vote for each other in their respective contests. >> ( translated ): if i were american, i would vote for obama. and i think if obama was from here, from barlovento or from some neighborhood in caracas, he would vote for chavez. i am sure of it. >> suarez: yet he's continued to thwart american efforts on a range of international issues, such as washington's attempt to convince iran's president mahmoud ahmadinejad to halt his country's pursuit of nuclear weapons. and he's stymied efforts to remove syria's president, bashar al-assad, by being an ally to the regime at the united nations and providing vital fuel to power assad's crackdown. indeed, as an aging fidel castro of cuba fades from visibility, chavez has supplanted him as the united states' nearest foe. and on the other side, running against chavez is david. for the first time, the typically fractured opposition has united around a challenger, henrique capriles radonski, a telegenic former governor of the pop
in the past few weeks, a sign both parties still think they can win here. president obama has taken a lead in recent polls. still, he is not headed into this election with the same advantage he had in 2008 when he won the state by ten points. two years ago, the republican party chipped away at the democrats lead, and now claim almost 11,000 more registered active voters. mitt romney came in a close second here in the january caucuses, that's four years after he ignored, and lost, the state-- also proof of how campaigning here can make a difference. republicans want to capitalize on that momentum. >> in 2008, the obama campaign had the organizational advantage in iowa. in 2012, republicans have stepped up their game. they had done more by april than john mccain did in iowa by election night in 2008. >> reporter: but political support in iowa doesn't simply rely on the sheer force of campaigning. there are more voters registered without party affiliation in iowa than there are republicans or democrats. many iowans measure the candidates independent of their party. voters like 19-year-old cha
>>> closed captioning of "this week in northern california" is made possible by the firemen's fund foundation. >> belva: the presidential candidates get back to the campaign trail after their first debate, with governor romney picking up some momentum. president obama returned to the golden state this weekend. there's high interest in several congressional races in the state. will california tip the scales for the control of the u.s. house? governor brown vetoes few of the more than 1,800 bills on his desk, as he presses for support of proposition 30 on the november ballot. and gas jumped as much as 20 cents overnight, with the spike expected to continue. plus, anti-domestic violence leader estra sola on making all violence an issue of global concern, coming up next. >>> good evening, i'm belva davis and welcome to "this week in northern california." on our news panel tonight, dan walters, political column nis for "the sacramento bee." in studio, we have tom vacar, computer editor for ktvu news and josh richman, regional political reporter for the bay asia news group. and joe garof
, their approaches are quite different. he kicks off our special coverage this week on job retraining. >> reporter: employers will tell you it's hard to find skilled workers. and both president obama and governor romney agree we need more effective programs to help people develop the skills to handle high-wage jobs. president obama is backing an $8 billion fund to help community colleges connect with businesses on workforce development. >> we've got to train our workers to fill good jobs. let's help give two million workers the chance to learn the skills they need at community colleges that will lead directly to a job. >> reporter: but government auditors report most federal job-training programs have not done the expensive studies needed to determine whether or not they are effective. and those that have done impact studies find only small or short-term benefits from job training. >> which i think is remarkable that, after five decades, that the main federal auditor, the g.a.o., can't really find that these programs work really well at all. >> reporter: but governor romney still talks up job trai
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)